Therapy and counseling for grief and loss in 11422.

Search Results For Grief and Trauma Counseling Near Rosedale, New York, 11422.
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Esther Goldstein, LCSW,MSW,CASAC-T

Licensed Clinical Psychotherapist

Carman Ave, Cedarhurst, New York 11516

Experiencing loss can be one of the most devastating parts of the human experience . Pain, shock, denial, anger, depression, rage, and acceptance are some emotions you may experience. I am here to sit with you and hold your sadness, as you process whatever it is that you are mourning; the death of a loved on, the end of a love relationship, position or change in family. Grieving is a necessary step in processing what has just happened, in effectively processing, understanding and slowly rebuilding your life, adjusted to the changes. It would be my honor to join you on your journey in healing and rebuilding your new reality, with inner strength, health and courage.

Marc Shulman, Psy.D.

Clinical Psychologist

721 Franklin Avenue, Garden City, New York 11530

When you suffer a significant loss it can be one of the most devastating experiences of your life. My approach to grief counseling begins with providing sensitive and supportive therapy to enable you to mourn your loss and slowly being the transition to moving forward without your loved one. If your pain is so overwhelming that you find it difficult to successfully function after you have had a period of time to recover, we will explore the obstacles that interfere with you moving ahead and implement practical strategies to assist you with improving your quality of life.

Marina Voron, MA, LMFT

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

243 Nassau Boulevard South, Garden City , New York 11530

Loss is something we are never fully prepared for, and grief can be a long, heart wrenching, and exhausting journey without empathy and some supportive guidance to move you past the pain. I will help you move past that stuck dark place, and help you get to a place of acceptance and emotional freedom. I am available for a free 15 minute phone consultation to determine whether therapy with me is right for you - to schedule, send an email to marina@nassauwellness.com or call/text (347) 699-5164.

Nicole Daisy, PhD

Clinical Psychologist

165 N. Village Avenue, Suite 200, Rockville Centre, New York 11570

Losing a loved is one of life's most difficult challenges. Coping with the stages of grief and mixed emotions can be overwhelming. After losing a loved one, we often feel like pressing the pause button from our usual busy schedules that maintain despite our need to grieve. Therapy can provide a safe space for you to take the time to process your grief.

John Kukor, Ed.D.

Psychotherapist

26 Aberdeen Road, New Hyde Park, New York 11040

A unique aspect of my psychotherapy practice is my readiness and willingness to discuss the issues of death and mortality. Life is precious and we deserve to live our lives fully, but death is an unavoidable fact of our lives. Many people can recall when they first learned about the fact of mortality in their childhood -- perhaps when a pet died, or we lost a grandparent or family member, or when some tragedy occurred. Witnessing a death or suffering the loss of a loved one can change some people's lives forever. In my practice I support my clients to come to terms with painful losses in their lives, and to regain their ability to live life fully, even in the face of their own mortality.

Kevin Fleming Ph.D.

Coach/Change Agent/Consultant

Sagaponack, New York 11550

Grey Matters International and the work of Kevin J. Fleming, Ph.D approaches issues of grief & loss through the lens of innovation----instead of growing the same neural networks responsible for the pain in weekly therapy sessions, we reset the brain to move forward quicker and efficiently by working on the stuck limbic system so as to empower the person with more success and traction. For no one wants to stay in a grief mode for too long; but when you don’t include the brain in your work with someone, you risk describing the water to them while they drown and calling it success. Contact Grey Matters International, Inc now at kevin@kevinflemingphd.com or 877-606-6161.

Zalman Nelson, LMSW

Licensed Professional Therapist

Forest Hills, New York 11375

Grief and loss are a powerful experience with many aspects and dimensions. No two people go through it the same. And we have much loss in our lives, besides our loved ones, and each is a mourning experience. Loss is part of life, but it doesn't have to be only a negative experince. When worked with properly, such experiences can be transformative, and fuel your growth.

Joel Stukalin, PHD, ABPP, FAACP, MS

QUEENS COUPLES COUNSELING CENTER

135 WHITSON STREET, FOREST HILLS, New York 11375

Dr. Joel Stukalin and Dr. Sara Mandelbaum have guided many clients like you through their grieving processes. Since each client is special and unique, we work with the utmost sensitivity to help you during this emotional period so often filled with many memories and feelings. Some clients also experience unfinished emotional business with the deceased, which we work through with substantial empathic understanding and patience. This sensitive collaboration with Dr. Joel and Dr. Sara is invaluable in supporting grieving clients to achieve a sense of therapeutic closure and relief. Clients have stated that doing this necessary grief work with Dr. Joel and Dr. Sara has restored their lives.

Lisa Lempel-Sander, LPsyA

Licensed Psychoanalyst

221 Hollywood Avenue, Douglaston, New York 11363

All too often, grief is rushed away. Certainly, as we try to resume our lives after a loss, grief can catch us in its grip, limiting our ability to focus, function, and feel joy. Grief work in treatment is beneficial because it offers the opportunity to express and explore your feelings about the person lost, including some of the more complicated feelings that may be difficult to recognize. This helps promote healing and a sense of resolution and can be instrumental in regaining your balance after a loss.

Elana Chasser, LCSW, CSAT, CMAT

Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Certified Sex Addiction Therapist, Certified Multiple Addiction Therapist

Merrick Avenue, Merrick, New York 11566

Any time we, or people close to us change, there is a loss; a loss of the familiar, perhaps a loss of what was known and comfortable. When you experience disappointment and need to change your expectations, there is a grief and loss process as well. Changing expectations is hard. The upside, though, is that doing so usually brings more contentment and peace, both for yourself and with others. I work to help people learn about their losses and find and define new expectations for their reality that will bring more joy to their lives.

Walter Masterson, LCSW

Psychotherapy and Counseling

Home visits, Nassau County, NY 11023

Grief and loss can be triggered by many things; the death of a loved one, the loss of a beloved mate, being let go at a valued job, and many others. When we cannot get over the loss by ourselves, a therapist point us down new roads. Suddenly vistas of possibility begin to open up, and what once seemed hopelessly sad begins to take on its proper importance.

Hal Brickman, LCSW, RCSW, CSW, MSW, CHT

New York State Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Manhasset, New York 11030

Grief and loss inevitably leads to anger & sadness. Not surprisingly, it also can lead to depression and feelings of guilt. The latter is called irrational guilt, as most of us lack magical powers to cure dying people. Even if they mean the world to us. I would encourage my clients to express feeling of guilt and anger often unconscious related to the loss. The anger is often at the person who died. Of course, this is irrational anger in most cases, as we all are going to die. The anger is over losing someone we love, value. I would use clinical interventions that usher in the grieving process. This fosters coming to terms with and an acceptance of the loss.

Patricia Pitta, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Clinical and Board Certified Family Psychologist

35 Bonnie Heights Road, Manhasset, New York 11030

Grief is about loss and the threat of loss. The stronger the bond between us and the person we have lost, the more we will hurt both physically and emotionally. When we are torn from a family member or friend, a part of us dies as well. Our natural need for attachment gets severed, often bringing the return of childhood fears. The world feels like a more dangerous place. As a result, we may feel out of control. We ache to have the loved person back. We know in the rational part of our minds that the person is not coming back, but it also seems impossible to let him go. We will remain emotionally conflicted until we can release our loved ones. Because letting go is so difficult, we must do it slow....

Priska Imberti, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

46-10 61st. Street, Woodside, New York 11377

People experiencing grief and loss are often invaded by mixed emotions and thoughts, including sadness, guilt, anger, feeling frozen or ambivalent, to mention some. Difficult but essential, is to make sense of the situation and find hope. I help clients understand that what has happened might not be altered, but that they can use their own powers and that of their support systems to master the present moment.

Johannes Marselis, LCSW, LCSW

Psychotherapist

26 Court St., Brooklyn, New York 11225

I am here to bear witness to your pain and to explore with you the path through it, including how much to let go of, and examination of what was lost. Grief and emotional, sometimes physical suffering are natural, albeit sometimes unbearable, responses to loss. Examining what it is that was lost, what needs it filled and how to cope in it's absence is very individual. Sometimes it hurts as a direct and equal reflection of how much we cared, for better or worse.

Judith Rapley Waterman, LMSW, ACC

Licensed social worker and Certified coach

10 Plaza Street East, Suite 1C , Brooklyn , New York 11238

Losing someone or something in your life differs from person to person. Some therapy and therapists as well as well-intending individuals try to give a cookie-cutter responses or answers as to how to handle this. Handling grief and loss healthily requires going deep to look at meaning, as meaning varies from person to person. Here we look at meaning together and help you figure out how to continue living while processing your loss!

Susan Bady, LCSW, BCD

Registered Psychotherapist

133 Eighth Avenue, apt 2B, , Brooklyn, New York 11215

I can help you manage grief and loss in a variety of ways. I proivide a safe and sympathetic space for you to express your feelings I offer tools of hypnosis, meditation, EMDr that can help soothe you and speed up the healing process. I encourage you to manage the pain in a way that leads to growth.

Charles Wininger, LP, LMHC

Licensed Psychotherapist, Licensed Mental Health Counselor

581 Fifth Street, Brooklyn, New York 11215

If you're suffering from the loss of a friend, relative or loved one, remember the quote that "We are the strongest in the broken places". Sometimes such a loss can hobble us and leave us feeling despairing, sad, depressed or anxious. I can help you (as I've helped so many others over time) to heal your pain and find your way through this rough patch to a new day.

Nassau Wellness Brooklyn, Teen and Family Therapy

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

26 Court St, Suite 2303, Brooklyn , New York 11242

Loss is something we are never fully prepared for, and grief can be a long, heart wrenching, and exhausting journey without empathy and some supportive guidance to move you past the pain. I will help you move past that stuck dark place, and help you get to a place of acceptance and emotional freedom. I am available for a free 15 minute phone consultation to determine whether therapy with me is right for you - to schedule, send an email to marina@nassauwellness.com or call/text (347) 699-5164.

Jonathan Schnapp, LCSW

Psychotherapist

240 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10009

Grief is a reaction to loss and it takes time. It is a process of learning how to live in a world that has changed in fundamental ways. When we lose a loved one, or a relationship ends, we have to relearn how to be with ourselves, our families and our friends. We must cope and manage painful feelings, and create new systems of meaning that allow us to live with joy and purpose despite our losses. Treatment can help you negotiate the various stages and painful emotions that are part of this process.

Water & Stone, a Creative Arts Therapy PLLC, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT, LCPAT

Founder & Director

155 Water Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201

Often when someone experiences a loss there are no words that can describe the experience. Creative arts therapy can offer another way to explore what is going on and to begin expressing or processing the emotions, thoughts, etc. that occur. This is a place to begin feeling grounded and supported as you work with the grief and/or loss experienced. The art will be both a tool and a reflection of the journey. No previous creative experience is necessary.

Lauren Levy, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

1623 Third Avenue Suite 202, , New York, New York 10128

Different people respond to grief and loss in many different ways. There is no right or wrong way to deal with loss. It is important to address the feelings that come up during the grieving process, whether they be painful memories or joyous ones. People often find that they work through unresolved issues from previous losses during this process. This helps people learn how to cope with death in a way that helps them move forward while being able to think about the person they've lost in a way that does not impact them like it did before.

Jeff Robinson, MSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

16 East 41st Street, New York, New York 10017

Grief and loss can come in many forms. While most people think of death and dying, loss can be a separation or divorce, loss of a job, retirement, moving, seeing a child off to college, losing weight. There are so many more that I could list. All of these have an impact on us and how we view ourselves and our world. They shake us, they make us feel a bit less steady. It requires a therapeutic relationship that is supportive, understanding and hopeful.

Maureen Berube, LMFT

Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

144 East 44th Street, Suite 401, New York, New York 10017

Grief is a reaction to loss that encompasses a range of feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. It is experienced differently by each person according to his or her culture, background, gender, beliefs, personality, and relationship to the deceased. I work with clients to express the full range of feelings that may be present including sadness, yearning, guilt, regret, anger, and a sense of meaninglessness. Clients become more comfortable with their loss over time; the amount of time varies by person.

Maria Sue Butler, LMFT, Supervisor State Of Florida

LMFT Diplomate, Certified of Anger management

It is very common for individuals to seek psychotherapy in times of grief. The death of a loved one is perhaps the single most intensive emotional experience an individual must face.We understand that sometimes there is little hope and trust because the road to recovery has been exhausting full of short-lived success. ART is dedicated to find an individualized treatment that closely fits the unique circumstances of each client; we do not apply "one size fits all" type of therapeutic treatment.

New York Behavioral Health, Ph.D.

New York Behavioral Health

380 Lexington Avenue, 17th Floor, New York, New York 10168

Grief is a natural state after a loss. Mourning is natural and healthy. Acute grief does not need to be pathologized or treated. Those experiencing complicated grief may benefit from speaking to a warm, caring professional. In addition, a skilled therapist can listen, help you understand if therapy is appropriate or not, and explain what complicated grief is. If you are having sleep problems or symptoms of depression or PTSD related to the loss, therapy could be helpful. Our therapists are here to help and not interfere with the natural healing process. If support and guidance could be helpful to you, please call us with any questions.

James Pearl, Ph.D.

Psychoanalyst

185 Madison Ave 15th fl, New York, New York 10016

Personal loss such as a loved one or due to trauma needs to be mourned in order to move on in one's life. This difficult process requires a 'witness' to the emotional loss. Psychoanalysis serves the function of enabling a person to speak about the loss. It enables an individual to remember in a way that enhances the individual survivor.

Annie Block Pearl, M.S.

Psychotherapist

185 Madison Avenue, 15th Floor Office #1, New York, New York 10016

Grief and loss are processes and like many processes, they change and transform. What feels like heartbreak to you at first, may be transformed through our work together, into a heart that has an even greater capacity for love and connection. I believe that heartbreak is necessary to break open and expand the heart's horizons. You will never forget those who you have held so dear and lost, but through our work together, you will make peace with those losses and appreciate the gifts of those relationships.

Staci Feinstein, LCSW

Psychotherapist and Eatng Disorder specialist

353 Lexington Avenue, Suite 1203, New York, New York 10016

I can help a client work through the significant and very vulnerable pain of loss. It is very important for someone experiencing grief to have a safe place to sort through their feelings with someone that gets it. I work with uncomplicated and complicated losses. We can work together to help you deal with the loss both emotionally and to figure out how to deal with living without the relationship.

Patricia Schneider, Dr., Ph. D.

Licensed Clinical Psychologist

260 Madison Ave. Ste. 8047, New York, New York 10016

Elements from different psychotherapy modalities will most effectively address matters of loss, depression and role change related to loss of a loved one, unresolved or traumatic grief, loss of the individual's youth, opportunities, or functional abilities. I target associated somatic distress, guilt, thoughts of the deceased, irritation and anger, lack of motivation, identification phenomena. The goal is for you to assimilate the reality and meaning of death so that while not forgetting the person you lost, not relinquishing associated sadness, still missing your loved one, you may once again engage in pleasurable and satisfying relationships and activities.

Jean Fitzpatrick, L.P.

Psychotherapist and Couples Counselor

35 East 35th Street (between Park and Madison), New York, New York 10016

After you have lost a loved one, well-meaning people say it's time to "get over it" or "move on." Grieving doesn't work that way. To absorb the experience of loss and find a way to hold onto the relationship with your loved one is a process that unfolds. We don't proceed through a standard set of "stages of grief;" sometimes you may experience many different stages -- from sadness to anger to disbelief -- all in one day. The supportive presence of an experienced, compassionate counselor can help you cope with the feelings and questions and rediscover your strength and vitality. To ask any questions you may have about grief and loss or to make an appointment, contact Jean Fitzpatrick.

Rev. Christopher Smith, LCAC, LMHC, LMFT

Helping you find wholeness...

124 East 40th Street, Ste 404, New York, New York 10016

Each individual's response to grief and loss is unique, and their response to different losses will have similarities and differences. There are several different periods of grief/loss in which people may seek help (before the loss, at the time of the loss, during the first few months after the loss and during later times). Some people seek to find ways that they can recognize and cope with the loss, some are concerned about how they are reacting, some seek help in dealing with others affected (especially children). It is possible to move through periods of grief and loss back to a sense of wholeness and peace. Christopher can help you through that process.

Joan Warren, LMFT

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

280 Madison Avenue Suite 208, New York City, New York 10016

Living life challenges us in so many ways, and dealing with grief and loss is something we must all face and endure. By offering you a safe and supportive space to express your grief and working with you to take steps to heal, there is hope for relief and change. Is it a quick fix? No. But by helping you regain a mindful sense of self, comforting connection with others and realistic efforts toward feeling peace, there is hope for joy.

John M. Montgomery, Ph.D.

John M. Montgomery

6 Washington Place, New York, New York 10003

All of us at different times have to deal with loss and grief. The key is always to find an appropriate balance whereby we can integrate and accept our new situation while still moving forward and not getting stuck in -- or, in my terminology, 'addicted' to -- the painful memories. There is also a danger, however, in not fully coming to terms with the source of grief and loss. I work hard to strike the appropriate balance in my therapeutic approach.

Michael Picucci, PhD, MAC, SEP

Holistic Psychologist, Author, Focalizer

44 East 12 Street, New York, New York 10003

Grief, when it surfaces, is one of the most confusing of human emotions. Together, we will soothingly allow the symptoms to lead us to the heart of the suffering where transformation is possible. If one allows it, there can be a sweetness and comfort in grief resolution. This is accessible as we resolve the barrier of complex feelings, and a part of you comes alive again. It makes sense that grieving enlivens. If there had been no significant bonding in these relationships to begin with, we would not be experiencing their loss as traumatic. While in the resolution process, you may experience a state of openness and vulnerability naturally opening to new learning and corrective experiences.

Heidi Seifert, LCSW-R, MA

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

85 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10003

When I very young I lost my fiancée. I went about life as if nothing had happened until it caught up to me. I was trying to open a door with a key and it wouldn't work. I found myself crying and felt out of control. This happened because I didn't want to grieve. What I learned is you can't skip this process. It will catch up to you at the strangest times. I can walk you through this without bottoming out. Ignoring it and avoiding it doesn't work

Gerald Schoenewolf, Ph.D.

Licensed Psychoanalyst

207 East 15th Street, New York, New York 10003

Grief and loss can happen when you're young or old. Whenever it happens it can result in an ongoing depression that can hamper your life. I understand how devastating it can be and use various approaches to help you recover and return to your best self. Having been there myself and worked through my own grief and loss, I know what it takes to overcome the pain of grief and loss, and I will help you overcome your own pain and regain your own healthy balance.

Anthony Tshering, LCSW

Psychotherapist

26 Court St, #614, Brooklyn, New York 11231

Losing someone we love is the hardest thing any human being has to experience. It can leave you devastated and nothing ever feels the same after. You aren't present in your work, in your home life or with your friends. Using a multi-faceted approach, empathetic approach, I allow my clients to fully feel and experience their grief in a nonjudgmental environment. And if the person is spiritually-inclined, I help the client put their grief in context from that point of view.

Barbara Dietz, LCSW

307 President Street, Brooklyn, New York 11231

When we have lost a person, a job, a healthy body, a reliable home life, a steady income, a longed for opportunity, we grieve in ways that often can compound our loss and make our lives even more difficult. I can walk you through your loss. Talking about what your loss means to you can help you integrate it into your larger life experience. Understanding the crucial role of loss in personal development can help prevent the pain of loss from becoming destructive, so that we can refocus our lives.

Tiffany Miller, Ph.D.

Psychologist

37 West 26th Street, Suite 312, New York, New York 10010

Whether it is a geographical move, a shift from college student to adulthood or the loss of a job, loss of a loved one, or a painful end to a relationship, these and other changes and losses can affect us powerfully. I work with people to process and mourn what no longer is and discover ways to acquire the personal flexibility needed to accommodate transition and loss.

Diane Davis, L.C.S.W.

Licensed Psychotherapist

49 West 24th Street, New York, New York 10010

The loss of an important person, can be a terrible shock. I help you with moving through the process of grieving, including issues of survivor guilt, anxiety and depression that may arise after a loss, whether it be loss of a person, job, or pet. When grief feels overwhelming, I can provide the support needed to find meaning in the past, and hope for the future.

Stephanie Vanden Bos, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

156 Fifth Ave., Suite 1223, New York, New York 10010

We all experience grief & loss from time to time. However, there are some losses that are simply too big to get through in the usual ways. At times like this we need additional support. Successful grieving entails coming to terms with the enormity of the loss and making tough decisions about how to meaningfully proceed with living in a world that no longer feels the same.

Stephanie Manes, JD, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

30 East 21st Street, Suite 2A4, New York, New York 10010

Our lives are marked by losses, big and small. Loss may be inevitable, but we can make meaning and find a place them in our personal stories. Whether you are grieving the loss of an important person or something more ambiguous like the loss of an ability, relationships, health or opportunity, I can help you move through your grief. I offer a safe space and a grounding presence that will allow you to properly mourn what has been left behind and to move again into the future.

Philip Kolba, MA

Psychotherapist

New York, New York 10013

Grief and loss is, unfortunately, a normal part of living. There is no single "correct" way to grieve: different cultures and even individuals from the same culture grieve differently. The only consistent feature is that grief takes time. The most effective thing anyone can do for someone grieving is to be there—to listen, to empathize, to walk along with the grief. There is no "fixing" grief. But counseling can help prevent normal grief from developing into major depression or other mental health conditions.

Lois Horowitz, Ph.D, LCSW

Psychotherapist

London Terrace Gardens/ Chelsea/ West 23rd Street, New York, New York 10011

Grief is a normal response to the loss of a relationship or the death of a loved one. Some people need help managing the overwhelming feelings of sadness, anxiety, anger, and the loneliness that occurs during the grieving process. I can help you to understand what you are feeling to promote a healing process. Please visit my website lhorowitz.com for more information about my qualifications

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