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May 14, 2019
by Ruth Gordon, MA, MSW, LCSW

monkey chatter

Monkey Chatter and You

May 14, 2019 13:15 by Ruth Gordon, MA, MSW, LCSW  [About the Author]

monkey chatter
What is monkey chatter? The term has emerged from the practice of Zen Buddhism. It refers to the silent monologue that passes, mostly negative, judgment on an individual’s every action, thought, and perceived misstep. It is so automatic that it is not unusual for individuals to be unaware of the misery being dredged up by unconscious thoughts and beliefs. [More]

May 14, 2019
by Patricia Tomasi

virtual reality

New Study Shows How Virtual Reality Could Be Used In the Treatment Of Autism, ADHD, and Schizophrenia

May 14, 2019 08:00 by Patricia Tomasi  [About the Author]

virtual reality
A new study from the University of Waterloo, published in Scientific Reports, aimed to examine the way we learn to perceive the passage of time. Is time perception rigidly fixed in the brain, or is it flexible and open to change? If the latter, how rapidly can our brain adapt to changes in timing statistics? [More]

May 7, 2019
by Patricia Tomasi

ptsd exposure therapy

New Study Findings Explain Why Exposure Therapy For PTSD Might Not Work For Everyone

May 7, 2019 08:00 by Patricia Tomasi  [About the Author]

ptsd exposure therapy
Traumatic experiences create long-lasting memories that can negatively impact our lives in a myriad of ways. A common treatment to overcome fear is called exposure therapy, or fear extinction, where patients are repeatedly confronted with the source of the fear. This typically is effective at dampening the fearful response, however, the original fear tends to relapse outside of the clinic, limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. Anthony F. Lacagnina and fellow researchers at the University of Texas at Austin wanted to know how the brain changes to adapt to extinction training, and what happens when relapse occurs. [More]

April 30, 2019
by Patricia Tomasi

cananbis pregnancy

New Study Finds Prenatal Marijuana Exposure Is Associated With A Small Increase In Psychosis In Children

April 30, 2019 08:00 by Patricia Tomasi  [About the Author]

cananbis pregnancy
A new study published in the JAMA Psychiatry examined whether maternal use of cannabis during pregnancy is associated with psychosis liability in offspring. “We expected that cannabis use would be associated with increased psychosis proneness in offspring,” study author Ryan Bogdan told us. “However, we also expected that some of this relationship might be accounted for by other potentially related factors (e.g., other substance use during pregnancy, maternal education, family history of psychopathology, maternal prenatal vitamin use, child substance use, etc.).” [More]

April 29, 2019
by Elizabeth Pratt

a poor neighbourhood

Growing Up in Poor Neighborhoods Increases Risk of Psychosis-Spectrum Illnesses

April 29, 2019 08:00 by Elizabeth Pratt  [About the Author]

a poor neighbourhood
Children who grow up in poor neighbourhoods are at an increased risk of developing a psychosis-spectrum mental illness like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder by the time they reach middle adulthood. Researchers say the finding of the study suggest interventions aimed at improving neighbourhoods and assisting children displaying atypical social characteristics could prevent the conditions from developing. [More]

April 26, 2019
by Tina Arnoldi

Photo by Megan Hodges on Unsplash

Potential Mental Health Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet

April 26, 2019 08:15 by Tina Arnoldi  [About the Author]

Photo by Megan Hodges on Unsplash
Many people practice the ketogenic diet for the purpose of losing weight, but some report mental health benefits, such as an improvement in symptoms for anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder. But clinical research is limited. There are no no listings for ‘mental health’ and ‘ketogenic diet’ on clinicaltrials.gov. However, if ketones impact brain function, why would they not impact mental health? [More]