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October 31, 2020
by Elizabeth Pratt

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The "Love Hormone" Oxytocin Can Cause Antisocial Behavior

October 31, 2020 08:00 by Elizabeth Pratt  [About the Author]

an oxytocin
The “love hormone” oxytocin can occasionally have anti-social effects depending on where in the brain it is created. Oxytocin, a hormone that can regulate prosocial behaviors like trust, bonding and empathy has also been demonstrated to play a role in anti-social behaviors like envy, anxiety and reduction in cooperation. How the hormone could have such opposing roles has long remained a mystery, but researchers from UC Davis have uncovered how this might happen. [More]

July 20, 2020
by Amy Rollo

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The Polyvagal Theory

July 20, 2020 16:21 by Amy Rollo  [About the Author]

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Looking back at the start of the pandemic, I witnessed two things. Shutting down- disengaging and stopping normal activities. Alternatively, doing too much- hoarding toilet paper, fighting people over cleaning wipes, and stocking up on food. Reading the news, it looked like everyone was losing their minds… me included. Understanding the polyvagal theory is helpful in understanding why people function the way they do in times of stress, and also why we as a society, have had a hard time regulating our emotions and behaviors again. [More]

May 19, 2020
by Patricia Tomasi

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The Link Between PTSD And Agression

May 19, 2020 08:00 by Patricia Tomasi  [About the Author]

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Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects eight per cent of adults in the United States. That means eight million Americans suffer from PTSD annually. Women are more likely to suffer from PTSD than men. While 10 per cent of women develop PTSD at some point in their lives, four per cent of men will experience PTSD. One of the responses to PTSD is anger as well as depression, chronic pain, sleep problems, substance misuse, suicide, and grief. A new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience examined the link between traumatic stress and aggression. [More]

April 10, 2020
by Tina Arnoldi

Photo by Metin Ozer on Unsplash

Family Separation at the Border: Who to Blame?

April 10, 2020 07:44 by Tina Arnoldi  [About the Author]

Photo by Metin Ozer on Unsplash
According to a human rights experts that performed psychological evaluations with immigrants, they stated that separation of families by immigration officials amounts to torture. In an investigation, “You Will Never See Your Child Again: The Persistent Psychological Effects of Family Separation,” Physicians for Human rights evaluated 17 adults and nine children from Central America who had been separated between 60 and 69 days. [More]

February 4, 2020
by Patricia Tomasi

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This Parenting Program Helps Parents Manage Stress

February 4, 2020 08:00 by Patricia Tomasi  [About the Author]

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A new study published in the Journal of Family Systems and Health looked at whether Parenting Journey, a 12-week parenting program based on the principles of family systems theory, helps parents manage stress and improve family strengths. This is the first study of the impact of Parenting Journey on parent-reported outcomes. While there are many parent training programs, researchers say there is still a need for effective supports that can be delivered in the community to parents of different races and backgrounds. [More]