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July 2, 2021
by Tina Arnoldi

Photo by Dylan Gillis on Unsplash

Back-to-Back Meetings Are Bad For Your Brain

July 2, 2021 08:26 by Tina Arnoldi  [About the Author]

Photo by Dylan Gillis on Unsplash
A 2021 study conducted by Microsoft concluded that back-to-back meetings are a “disaster” for productivity and mental health. The study was carried out by analyzing the brain activity of employees who volunteered to be hooked up to EEG, with one group sticking with consecutive meetings while the other had breaks in between. [More]

April 27, 2021
by Patricia Tomasi

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Does Bias Play A Role In Foodborne Illness Outbreaks?

April 27, 2021 08:00 by Patricia Tomasi  [About the Author]

bigstock food delivery in the restauran 382607975 1
A new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics looked at behavioral ethics and the incidence of foodborne illness outbreaks. “The study is about understanding why foodborne illness outbreaks are a persistent problem, especially given the technologies we have for processing and preserving foods,” study author Harvey S. James Jr. told us. [More]

March 16, 2021
by Patricia Tomasi

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New Study Looks At Why People Spread Misinformation And Why People Believe It

March 16, 2021 08:00 by Patricia Tomasi  [About the Author]

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A new study published in the British Journal of Social Psychology looked at how people who frequently try to impress or persuade others predicts receptivity to various types of misleading information. “On a basic level, it’s investigating some of the ways that misinformation is spread (intentionally and unintentionally) and evaluated by people when they encounter it,” study author Shane Littrell told us. [More]

December 18, 2020
by Tina Arnoldi

Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash

Virtual Reality: The Answer to Zoom Fatigue?

December 18, 2020 08:35 by Tina Arnoldi  [About the Author]

Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash
“Zoom fatigue” is a catchphrase for 2020 as the pandemic forced in person meetings online. But is there a better alternative? A study by Ericsson, “The Dematerialized Office”, predicts that augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) would “enable the experience of collaborating in the same room with colleagues.'' If this becomes a routine solution in the business world, it will likely become commonplace for personal use, including therapy. However, is this introducing another potential solution that people will grow tired of? [More]

December 11, 2020
by Tina Arnoldi

Photo by Miika Laaksonen on Unsplash

The Value of Comics in Mental Health Education

December 11, 2020 08:56 by Tina Arnoldi  [About the Author]

Photo by Miika Laaksonen on Unsplash
In an earlier post for Theravive, I examined how cartoons and comics might be a useful way to educate people on mental health concerns. This fall, I interviewed Cara Bean to learn about the process behind Vermont’s Center for Cartoon Studies released “Let’s Talk About It: A Graphic Guide To Mental Health” about its use for education. Recently, there was an article in the Open Library of Humanities about the perceived value in using comics to teach mental health professionals. [More]

December 8, 2020
by Patricia Tomasi

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New Study Settles Centuries-Old Question Of The Brain And Our Economic Choices

December 8, 2020 08:00 by Patricia Tomasi  [About the Author]

bigstock pensive young woman with short 342856642
A new study published in the Journal of Nature looked at neurons, values, and our economic choices. “The behavior we engage in, for example, when we are sitting in a restaurant and contemplating the menu,” study author Dr. Camillo Paoda-Schioppa told us. “Let’s say that there are two options – pizza or burger. How do we make that choice?” Fifteen years ago, research in neuroscience demonstrated that values are real, in the sense that neurons in the brain compute and represent the values assigned to the various options. That result was a breakthrough, and a large number of studies subsequently confirmed the initial findings. However, it remained unclear whether and how neurons encoding values directly participate in the choice process. [More]