Therapy and counseling for grief and loss in 10025.

Search Results For Grief and Trauma Counseling Near New York, New York, 10025.
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Angela Monti Fox, LCSW, MS,PC

Angela Monti Fox, Licensed Mental Health Professional

276 Riverside Drive (100 Street), New York, New York 10025

When a "loss" occurs in life sometimes it is difficult to know where to turn. Friends and family although they may be well meaning are often unable to say the right words or do the right thing to comfort you. Perhaps you feel you will never get over this feeling - the hole in your heart that has been created by this loss. Although you may not have thought of entering counseling for this type of reason, it is in fact one of the most common reasons people seek help. Loss is traumatic and can really derail you in achieving your goals or feeling like yourself again. Although you may not think it possible, I can help you heal and get back on track.

Helen Borel, RN,MFA,PhD

PsychoTherapist and PsychoAnalyst

200 West 79th Street - Apt. 9L, Manhattan, New York 10024

There are four phases of grief which you'll go through when you've lost someone, before you can move to the next part of your life. There's shock. Then the pain of realizing who you've lost, what he or she meant to you, a gut-struggle about how you'll move on without him or her. Next comes "bargaining," a way your brain protects you from too much suffering. Whether it's to your God or another spiritual connection of yours, you may try asking for the lost person's return if you do this or that "good" thing. Finally, as your loss becomes real to you, comes Acceptance. Over my 20 years of practice, I've guided patients gently through each of these difficult stages of loss and personal growth.

Ari Fox, LCSW-R

Child, Adolescent and Young Adult Psychotherapist

168 West 86th St- Suite 1D, New York City, New York 10024

Have you lost a family member or a close friend? The feelings associated with a loss can be painful, overwhelming and complex. For some the pain is so great, it is hard to imagine life without the loved-one. Sadness, anger, guilt There is no "right" way to grieve. Different people cope with loss in many ways. Speaking with a trained therapist, though, can help you process the loss and move on. Together, in a safe and supportive environment you can learn to manage the pain and slowly begin to adjust to life in the absence of your loved-one. Of course, there are many other types of loss, including the loss of health, a friendship or partner, a job. You do not have to face these alone!

Howard Rossen, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

59 West 74th street, New York, New York 10023

Sometimes events overpower our ability to cope. The loss of a loved one can throw our daily coping mechanism completely out of control. We all understand the early stages of loss but after awhile we feel that we should be coping better and just find that we can't. That is when a caring therapist can be of help. There is no time limit for the grieving process. It is a very personal experience. I always remind my patients that our job is never to forget, but rather to learn how to put those powerful memories into a safe place within our heart so that we can move forward with our lives. Only then can we begin to breathe again.

Nikki DiFranks, PhD, MA, MS, LCSW-R

Dr. Nikki Nelson DiFranks

1841 Broadway, Suite 700, New York City, New York 10023

Depression and grief are often confounded. Although the etiology may be different, the shared characteristic is the overwhelming sense of sadness and loss, which can be amenable to cognitive-behavioral techniques. Understanding of the progression through the stages of grief (typically Kubler-Ross) is usually helpful. I have had particular experience with patients who are immobilized by prolongued grieving.

Lauren Levy, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

1623 Third Avenue Suite 202, , New York, New York 10128

Different people respond to grief and loss in many different ways. There is no right or wrong way to deal with loss. It is important to address the feelings that come up during the grieving process, whether they be painful memories or joyous ones. People often find that they work through unresolved issues from previous losses during this process. This helps people learn how to cope with death in a way that helps them move forward while being able to think about the person they've lost in a way that does not impact them like it did before.

Hal Brickman, LCSW, RCSW, CSW, MSW, CHT

New York State Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Great Neck, New York 10021

Grief and loss inevitably leads to anger & sadness. Not surprisingly, it also can lead to depression and feelings of guilt. The latter is called irrational guilt, as most of us lack magical powers to cure dying people. Even if they mean the world to us. I would encourage my clients to express feeling of guilt and anger often unconscious related to the loss. The anger is often at the person who died. Of course, this is irrational anger in most cases, as we all are going to die. The anger is over losing someone we love, value. I would use clinical interventions that usher in the grieving process. This fosters coming to terms with and an acceptance of the loss.

Walter Masterson, LCSW

Psychotherapy and Counseling

321 E 69th Street, 3F, New York, New York 10021

Grief and loss can be triggered by many things; the death of a loved one, the loss of a beloved mate, being let go at a valued job, and many others. When we cannot get over the loss by ourselves, a therapist point us down new roads. Suddenly vistas of possibility begin to open up, and what once seemed hopelessly sad begins to take on its proper importance.

Kevin Fleming Ph.D.

Coach/Change Agent/Consultant

New York City , New York 10065

Grey Matters International and the work of Kevin J. Fleming, Ph.D approaches issues of grief & loss through the lens of innovation----instead of growing the same neural networks responsible for the pain in weekly therapy sessions, we reset the brain to move forward quicker and efficiently by working on the stuck limbic system so as to empower the person with more success and traction. For no one wants to stay in a grief mode for too long; but when you don’t include the brain in your work with someone, you risk describing the water to them while they drown and calling it success. Contact Grey Matters International, Inc now at kevin@kevinflemingphd.com or 877-606-6161.

Maggie Vaughan, LMFT, PhD

Psychotherapist

330 W. 58th St, Suite 203, New York, New York 10019

The loss of a loved one is a tremendously painful and personal process. Grief and bereavement therapy with Dr. Vaughan provides a source of support and serves as an outlet for expressing the wide array of emotions and experiences - disbelief, anger, depression, sadness, emptiness, heartbreak, denial, guilt - that often comprise the grieving process. In a confidential, non-judgmental and supportive environment, Dr. Vaughan helps clients to make sense of their experiences and to find ways of coping with strong emotions.

Bennett Pologe, Ph.D.

Psychologist

330 west 58th street - suite 601, new york, New York 10019

Grief is something you will, unfortunately, have to go through. You can't go around it, skip over it to the end, or otherwise avoid it. I can help you realize when you are going through the process and when you're fleeing it in a way that will come back to bit you in the ***. On the positive side, going through grief is not as complicated as it's sometimes cracked up to be. Talking - with the right person - goes a long way to moving the process forward.

Zalman Nelson, LMSW

Licensed Professional Therapist

New York, New York 10022

Grief and loss are a powerful experience with many aspects and dimensions. No two people go through it the same. And we have much loss in our lives, besides our loved ones, and each is a mourning experience. Loss is part of life, but it doesn't have to be only a negative experince. When worked with properly, such experiences can be transformative, and fuel your growth.

Maria Sue Butler, LMFT, Supervisor State Of Florida

LMFT Diplomate, Certified of Anger management

It is very common for individuals to seek psychotherapy in times of grief. The death of a loved one is perhaps the single most intensive emotional experience an individual must face.We understand that sometimes there is little hope and trust because the road to recovery has been exhausting full of short-lived success. ART is dedicated to find an individualized treatment that closely fits the unique circumstances of each client; we do not apply "one size fits all" type of therapeutic treatment.

Jeff Robinson, MSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

16 East 41st Street, New York, New York 10017

Grief and loss can come in many forms. While most people think of death and dying, loss can be a separation or divorce, loss of a job, retirement, moving, seeing a child off to college, losing weight. There are so many more that I could list. All of these have an impact on us and how we view ourselves and our world. They shake us, they make us feel a bit less steady. It requires a therapeutic relationship that is supportive, understanding and hopeful.

Maureen Berube, LMFT

Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

144 East 44th Street, Suite 401, New York, New York 10017

Grief is a reaction to loss that encompasses a range of feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. It is experienced differently by each person according to his or her culture, background, gender, beliefs, personality, and relationship to the deceased. I work with clients to express the full range of feelings that may be present including sadness, yearning, guilt, regret, anger, and a sense of meaninglessness. Clients become more comfortable with their loss over time; the amount of time varies by person.

New York Behavioral Health, Ph.D.

New York Behavioral Health

380 Lexington Avenue, 17th Floor, New York, New York 10168

Grief is a natural state after a loss. Mourning is natural and healthy. Acute grief does not need to be pathologized or treated. Those experiencing complicated grief may benefit from speaking to a warm, caring professional. In addition, a skilled therapist can listen, help you understand if therapy is appropriate or not, and explain what complicated grief is. If you are having sleep problems or symptoms of depression or PTSD related to the loss, therapy could be helpful. Our therapists are here to help and not interfere with the natural healing process. If support and guidance could be helpful to you, please call us with any questions.

Edgard Danielsen, PhD, LP

Licensed Psychoanalyst

7 West 30th Street, New York, New York 10001

The pain you experience after losing a loved one is an intense human experience that could make you feel abandoned, hopeless, and incapable of moving forward in life. In addition, sometimes there is grief connected to losing something: a job, an opportunity, a past that will not come back, a country you left behind. I can offer an empathic ear and listening to you as you ponder important questions at this point in your life: What does your grief say? What are the fears that accompany your grief and loss? Is there a way to move forward in life knowing that the present and future will be different because someone or something won't be there with you?

Carolyn AlRoy, Psy.D.

Licensed Psychologist

19 West 34th St., Penthouse, New York, New York 10001

If it is a past loss we will talk about that relationship and what it meant to you, and see how that person affected you in your current life and what he/she meant to you. If it is a current or impending loss, we can focus on day-to-day issues to lessen anxiety, and process how to handle what time is left. Practical issues may be discussed. if you find yourself obsessing we will probably focus on feeling, if you find yourself lost in feeling, we may focus on verbalizing your thoughts and your feelings. If you are overwhelmed by depression and find it difficult to function, I will make recommendations for medications and/or alternative strategies.

H.C. Fall Willeboordse, LCSW-R

Fall Willeboordse, LCSW-R

244 5th Ave. Suite 9G, New York, New York 10001

At times grief can be all encompassing and take away one’s sense of meaning, place in the world ,or hope in the future. I work with people to find small openings from where you can see that, although it may feel like it, grief is not a static state which will be here forever but something that can be moved through in order to create meaning in life after loss.

Barbara Bennett, LMFT

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

245 west 29th Street, suite 304, New york, New York 10001

Loss is an inevitable part of life, through the loss of a loved one, the loss of health, or the letting go of a long-held dream. The grief that follows is a natural part of the healing process, but it is difficult and painful. For many, the pain of grief can be overwhelming and there seems to be no end in sight. I help clients understand and accept where they are, to develop ways of coping, and to build a new path forward.

Lauren Rigney, MS, LMHC, NCC, DCC, ACS

Licensed Mental Health Counselor

352 7th Avenue, Suite 1201, New York, New York 10001

We will work together to remember your loss and to move forward in life. You will be able to identify what the loss means to you and if that is causing you to remain stuck in the grieving process. I will help you use that meaning to start a healing journey. You will learn to take advantage of community resources and I will help support you through a difficult range of emotions. You will learn the interaction of your thoughts, emotions, and behaviors during the grieving process.

Staci Feinstein, LCSW

Psychotherapist and Eatng Disorder specialist

353 Lexington Avenue, Suite 1203, New York, New York 10016

I can help a client work through the significant and very vulnerable pain of loss. It is very important for someone experiencing grief to have a safe place to sort through their feelings with someone that gets it. I work with uncomplicated and complicated losses. We can work together to help you deal with the loss both emotionally and to figure out how to deal with living without the relationship.

James Pearl, Ph.D.

Psychoanalyst

185 Madison Ave 15th fl, New York, New York 10016

Personal loss such as a loved one or due to trauma needs to be mourned in order to move on in one's life. This difficult process requires a 'witness' to the emotional loss. Psychoanalysis serves the function of enabling a person to speak about the loss. It enables an individual to remember in a way that enhances the individual survivor.

Jean Fitzpatrick, L.P.

Psychotherapist and Couples Counselor

35 East 35th Street (between Park and Madison), New York, New York 10016

After you have lost a loved one, well-meaning people say it's time to "get over it" or "move on." Grieving doesn't work that way. To absorb the experience of loss and find a way to hold onto the relationship with your loved one is a process that unfolds. We don't proceed through a standard set of "stages of grief;" sometimes you may experience many different stages -- from sadness to anger to disbelief -- all in one day. The supportive presence of an experienced, compassionate counselor can help you cope with the feelings and questions and rediscover your strength and vitality. To ask any questions you may have about grief and loss or to make an appointment, contact Jean Fitzpatrick.

Joan Warren, LMFT

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

280 Madison Avenue Suite 208, New York City, New York 10016

Living life challenges us in so many ways, and dealing with grief and loss is something we must all face and endure. By offering you a safe and supportive space to express your grief and working with you to take steps to heal, there is hope for relief and change. Is it a quick fix? No. But by helping you regain a mindful sense of self, comforting connection with others and realistic efforts toward feeling peace, there is hope for joy.

Rev. Christopher Smith, LCAC, LMHC, LMFT

Helping you find wholeness...

124 East 40th Street, Ste 404, New York, New York 10016

Each individual's response to grief and loss is unique, and their response to different losses will have similarities and differences. There are several different periods of grief/loss in which people may seek help (before the loss, at the time of the loss, during the first few months after the loss and during later times). Some people seek to find ways that they can recognize and cope with the loss, some are concerned about how they are reacting, some seek help in dealing with others affected (especially children). It is possible to move through periods of grief and loss back to a sense of wholeness and peace. Christopher can help you through that process.

Patricia Schneider, Dr., Ph. D.

Licensed Clinical Psychologist

260 Madison Ave. Ste. 8047, New York, New York 10016

Elements from different psychotherapy modalities will most effectively address matters of loss, depression and role change related to loss of a loved one, unresolved or traumatic grief, loss of the individual's youth, opportunities, or functional abilities. I target associated somatic distress, guilt, thoughts of the deceased, irritation and anger, lack of motivation, identification phenomena. The goal is for you to assimilate the reality and meaning of death so that while not forgetting the person you lost, not relinquishing associated sadness, still missing your loved one, you may once again engage in pleasurable and satisfying relationships and activities.

Annie Block Pearl, M.S.

Psychotherapist

185 Madison Avenue, 15th Floor Office #1, New York, New York 10016

Grief and loss are processes and like many processes, they change and transform. What feels like heartbreak to you at first, may be transformed through our work together, into a heart that has an even greater capacity for love and connection. I believe that heartbreak is necessary to break open and expand the heart's horizons. You will never forget those who you have held so dear and lost, but through our work together, you will make peace with those losses and appreciate the gifts of those relationships.

Tiffany Miller, Ph.D.

Psychologist

37 West 26th Street, Suite 312, New York, New York 10010

Whether it is a geographical move, a shift from college student to adulthood or the loss of a job, loss of a loved one, or a painful end to a relationship, these and other changes and losses can affect us powerfully. I work with people to process and mourn what no longer is and discover ways to acquire the personal flexibility needed to accommodate transition and loss.

Diane Davis, L.C.S.W.

Licensed Psychotherapist

49 West 24th Street, New York, New York 10010

The loss of an important person, can be a terrible shock. I help you with moving through the process of grieving, including issues of survivor guilt, anxiety and depression that may arise after a loss, whether it be loss of a person, job, or pet. When grief feels overwhelming, I can provide the support needed to find meaning in the past, and hope for the future.

Stephanie Vanden Bos, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

156 Fifth Ave., Suite 1223, New York, New York 10010

We all experience grief & loss from time to time. However, there are some losses that are simply too big to get through in the usual ways. At times like this we need additional support. Successful grieving entails coming to terms with the enormity of the loss and making tough decisions about how to meaningfully proceed with living in a world that no longer feels the same.

Philip Kolba, MA

Psychotherapist

New York, New York 10011

Grief and loss is, unfortunately, a normal part of living. There is no single "correct" way to grieve: different cultures and even individuals from the same culture grieve differently. The only consistent feature is that grief takes time. The most effective thing anyone can do for someone grieving is to be there—to listen, to empathize, to walk along with the grief. There is no "fixing" grief. But counseling can help prevent normal grief from developing into major depression or other mental health conditions.

Lois Horowitz, Ph.D, LCSW

Psychotherapist

London Terrace Gardens/ Chelsea/ West 23rd Street, New York, New York 10011

Grief is a normal response to the loss of a relationship or the death of a loved one. Some people need help managing the overwhelming feelings of sadness, anxiety, anger, and the loneliness that occurs during the grieving process. I can help you to understand what you are feeling to promote a healing process. Please visit my website lhorowitz.com for more information about my qualifications

Gerald Schoenewolf, Ph.D.

Licensed Psychoanalyst

207 East 15th Street, New York, New York 10003

Grief and loss can happen when you're young or old. Whenever it happens it can result in an ongoing depression that can hamper your life. I understand how devastating it can be and use various approaches to help you recover and return to your best self. Having been there myself and worked through my own grief and loss, I know what it takes to overcome the pain of grief and loss, and I will help you overcome your own pain and regain your own healthy balance.

Michael Picucci, PhD, MAC, SEP

Holistic Psychologist, Author, Focalizer

44 East 12 Street, New York, New York 10003

Grief, when it surfaces, is one of the most confusing of human emotions. Together, we will soothingly allow the symptoms to lead us to the heart of the suffering where transformation is possible. If one allows it, there can be a sweetness and comfort in grief resolution. This is accessible as we resolve the barrier of complex feelings, and a part of you comes alive again. It makes sense that grieving enlivens. If there had been no significant bonding in these relationships to begin with, we would not be experiencing their loss as traumatic. While in the resolution process, you may experience a state of openness and vulnerability naturally opening to new learning and corrective experiences.

Heidi Seifert, LCSW-R, MA

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

85 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10003

When I very young I lost my fiancée. I went about life as if nothing had happened until it caught up to me. I was trying to open a door with a key and it wouldn't work. I found myself crying and felt out of control. This happened because I didn't want to grieve. What I learned is you can't skip this process. It will catch up to you at the strangest times. I can walk you through this without bottoming out. Ignoring it and avoiding it doesn't work

John M. Montgomery, Ph.D.

John M. Montgomery

6 Washington Place, New York, New York 10003

All of us at different times have to deal with loss and grief. The key is always to find an appropriate balance whereby we can integrate and accept our new situation while still moving forward and not getting stuck in -- or, in my terminology, 'addicted' to -- the painful memories. There is also a danger, however, in not fully coming to terms with the source of grief and loss. I work hard to strike the appropriate balance in my therapeutic approach.

Konstantin Lukin, Ph.D.

Clinical Psychologist

223 Bloomfield Street, suite 107, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030

We all experience different types of losses over the course of our lives: loss of a loved one, of a job, of a role, or of a way of life. Everyone is affected differently by loss - often the same event can have very different meanings for different people. At the Lukin Center, we work with clients who are grieving a loss to help them identify what the loss means for them in order to work through and grow from their grief.

Nataliya Rusetskaya, Ph.D., LCSW,

Licensed Psychotherapist, Certified Couple and Sex Therapist

132 Washington st, Suite 301, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030

I use CPT (Cognitive Processing Therapy) approach to work with the grief and loss that you might be going through. As a part of that approach you might be asked to think, talk, sometimes write at home some thoughts and memories that I will ask you about. It will give you a chance to slow down and give attention to grieving the loss of the loved ones. I use specific manual to walk you through this process.

Priska Imberti, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

46-10 61st. Street, Woodside, New York 11377

People experiencing grief and loss are often invaded by mixed emotions and thoughts, including sadness, guilt, anger, feeling frozen or ambivalent, to mention some. Difficult but essential, is to make sense of the situation and find hope. I help clients understand that what has happened might not be altered, but that they can use their own powers and that of their support systems to master the present moment.

Jonathan Schnapp, LCSW

Psychotherapist

240 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10009

Grief is a reaction to loss and it takes time. It is a process of learning how to live in a world that has changed in fundamental ways. When we lose a loved one, or a relationship ends, we have to relearn how to be with ourselves, our families and our friends. We must cope and manage painful feelings, and create new systems of meaning that allow us to live with joy and purpose despite our losses. Treatment can help you negotiate the various stages and painful emotions that are part of this process.

Judy Strauss, PhD, LCSW

Psychotherapist /Psychoanalyst

3333 Henry Hudson Parkway, Riverdale, New York 10463

Have you recently experienced the loss of a loved one ? Regardless of how prepared one is the loss of a dear family member or friend can be a devastating and paralyzing experience. When there is attachment to a person over many years they become a part of our being. Their loss diminishes us and a part of us is forever changed. Experiencing the feelings of grief and loss alone can be overwhelming. Psychotherapy can ameliorate pain associated with deep grief and sorrow at the loss of a loved one.

Comprehensive Counseling LCSWs, LMHC, PhD, MD

Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Psychologists & Psychiatrists

3174 Riverdale Ave. Suite #2, Riverdale, New York 10463

People may experience many common symptoms related to grief and loss after losing a loved-one. Patients may also pass through stages of denial, anger and depression. Therapy can help an individual process these feelings and navigate these stages. A main goal when working with grief and loss may be to reach the period of acceptance (the time of closure). Talk therapy with a professional can be a very healthy approach to dealing with loss.

Mars & Venus Counseling Center, LCSWs, DCSW, LPCs, MFTs, LCADC, CTP

LCSWs, DCSW, LPCs, MFTs, LCADC, CTP, and Ph.D.

691 Cedar Ln, Teaneck, New Jersey 07666

Loss can come in so many different forms, yet the pain is there and is strong. When we hold someone or something dear to our heart and then they suddenly gone, we are often left with a hole in our heart and need to grieve that loss. Grief looks different for each person. There are 5 main stages of grief that most people will go through in an order: Denial and Isolation, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance. These are hard stages to walk through alone. Reach out and call one of our compassionate therapists at Mars and Venus Counseling Center who can help you to talk through each of the emotions that you experience at each stage.

Water & Stone, a Creative Arts Therapy PLLC, MA, ATR-BC, LCAT, LCPAT

Founder & Director

155 Water Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201

Often when someone experiences a loss there are no words that can describe the experience. Creative arts therapy can offer another way to explore what is going on and to begin expressing or processing the emotions, thoughts, etc. that occur. This is a place to begin feeling grounded and supported as you work with the grief and/or loss experienced. The art will be both a tool and a reflection of the journey. No previous creative experience is necessary.

Nassau Wellness Brooklyn, Teen and Family Therapy

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

26 Court St, Suite 2303, Brooklyn , New York 11242

Loss is something we are never fully prepared for, and grief can be a long, heart wrenching, and exhausting journey without empathy and some supportive guidance to move you past the pain. I will help you move past that stuck dark place, and help you get to a place of acceptance and emotional freedom. I am available for a free 15 minute phone consultation to determine whether therapy with me is right for you - to schedule, send an email to marina@nassauwellness.com or call/text (347) 699-5164.

Marina Voron, MA, LMFT

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

26 Court St, Suite 2302, Brooklyn, New York 11242

Loss is something we are never fully prepared for, and grief can be a long, heart wrenching, and exhausting journey without empathy and some supportive guidance to move you past the pain. I will help you move past that stuck dark place, and help you get to a place of acceptance and emotional freedom. I am available for a free 15 minute phone consultation to determine whether therapy with me is right for you - to schedule, send an email to marina@nassauwellness.com or call/text (347) 699-5164.

Joel Stukalin, PHD, ABPP, FAACP, MS

QUEENS COUPLES COUNSELING CENTER

135 WHITSON STREET, FOREST HILLS, New York 11375

Dr. Joel Stukalin and Dr. Sara Mandelbaum have guided many clients like you through their grieving processes. Since each client is special and unique, we work with the utmost sensitivity to help you during this emotional period so often filled with many memories and feelings. Some clients also experience unfinished emotional business with the deceased, which we work through with substantial empathic understanding and patience. This sensitive collaboration with Dr. Joel and Dr. Sara is invaluable in supporting grieving clients to achieve a sense of therapeutic closure and relief. Clients have stated that doing this necessary grief work with Dr. Joel and Dr. Sara has restored their lives.

Judith Rapley Waterman, LMSW, ACC

Licensed social worker and Certified coach

10 Plaza Street East, Suite 1C , Brooklyn , New York 11238

Losing someone or something in your life differs from person to person. Some therapy and therapists as well as well-intending individuals try to give a cookie-cutter responses or answers as to how to handle this. Handling grief and loss healthily requires going deep to look at meaning, as meaning varies from person to person. Here we look at meaning together and help you figure out how to continue living while processing your loss!

Anthony Tshering, LCSW

Psychotherapist

26 Court St, #614, Brooklyn, New York 11231

Losing someone we love is the hardest thing any human being has to experience. It can leave you devastated and nothing ever feels the same after. You aren't present in your work, in your home life or with your friends. Using a multi-faceted approach, empathetic approach, I allow my clients to fully feel and experience their grief in a nonjudgmental environment. And if the person is spiritually-inclined, I help the client put their grief in context from that point of view.

Barbara Dietz, LCSW

307 President Street, Brooklyn, New York 11231

When we have lost a person, a job, a healthy body, a reliable home life, a steady income, a longed for opportunity, we grieve in ways that often can compound our loss and make our lives even more difficult. I can walk you through your loss. Talking about what your loss means to you can help you integrate it into your larger life experience. Understanding the crucial role of loss in personal development can help prevent the pain of loss from becoming destructive, so that we can refocus our lives.

Susan Bady, LCSW, BCD

Registered Psychotherapist

133 Eighth Avenue, apt 2B, , Brooklyn, New York 11215

I can help you manage grief and loss in a variety of ways. I proivide a safe and sympathetic space for you to express your feelings I offer tools of hypnosis, meditation, EMDr that can help soothe you and speed up the healing process. I encourage you to manage the pain in a way that leads to growth.

Charles Wininger, LP, LMHC

Licensed Psychotherapist, Licensed Mental Health Counselor

581 Fifth Street, Brooklyn, New York 11215

If you're suffering from the loss of a friend, relative or loved one, remember the quote that "We are the strongest in the broken places". Sometimes such a loss can hobble us and leave us feeling despairing, sad, depressed or anxious. I can help you (as I've helped so many others over time) to heal your pain and find your way through this rough patch to a new day.

Johannes Marselis, LCSW, LCSW

Psychotherapist

26 Court St., Brooklyn, New York 11225

I am here to bear witness to your pain and to explore with you the path through it, including how much to let go of, and examination of what was lost. Grief and emotional, sometimes physical suffering are natural, albeit sometimes unbearable, responses to loss. Examining what it is that was lost, what needs it filled and how to cope in it's absence is very individual. Sometimes it hurts as a direct and equal reflection of how much we cared, for better or worse.

Joanna Buset, LPC

Licensed Professional Counselor, Specializing in Children & Adolescents

777 Passaic Avenue, Clifton, New Jersey 07012

If you or your child has experienced a significant loss, you know how difficult it can be to get back into the rhythm of life, and to find joy and hope once again. Perhaps you or your child are full of sadness, anger or fear... or simply confused and overwhelmed... As a parent, you may find yourself withdrawn or over-reactive, and then feel guilty about how this effects your child's moods. You may also find yourself at a loss as to how to help your child process his or her grief, talk about feelings in a helpful way, and yet also find happiness in daily activities. I can help you through the many facets of grieving, so that you and your child can create a positive future...

Lisa Lempel-Sander, LPsyA

Licensed Psychoanalyst

221 Hollywood Avenue, Douglaston, New York 11363

All too often, grief is rushed away. Certainly, as we try to resume our lives after a loss, grief can catch us in its grip, limiting our ability to focus, function, and feel joy. Grief work in treatment is beneficial because it offers the opportunity to express and explore your feelings about the person lost, including some of the more complicated feelings that may be difficult to recognize. This helps promote healing and a sense of resolution and can be instrumental in regaining your balance after a loss.

Marty Tashman, Ph.D.(psychology), ACSW, M.S.W.

Dr. Marty

622 -624 Valley Road, Uppper Montclair, New Jersey 07043

Grief Counseling Grief counseling is a journey with many turns in the road. One moment you can’t imagine how you can go on and the next, it’s seems like maybe the cloud is beginning to lift. When I work with someone who is experiencing grief, I sit with them during the painful trip that they are taking. Grief counseling more than any other kind of counseling as blend of spirituality and practical reality, In our work together we will work with both parts of the healing; how to gain some perspective that can help us to go on and practical things that can be done to help with deal with painful difficulties in relating to the deep sense of loss. Dr. Marty also uses techniques from EMDR (a t....

Lewis Pagano, LPC

Licensed Professioal Counselor

33 Plymouth St Ste LL1, Montclair, New Jersey 07042

I believe loss is a major issue in life and every loss brings up past losses. I work closely with individuals with all past losses to resolve current losses. This can result in relieve from extreme symptoms of loss.I have an extensive background in working with individuals with grief and loss issues from childhood also which is important in resoling current losses.

Abby Mullen, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

475 White Plains Road Suite 23, Eastchester, New York 10709

Grief in and of itself is not a diagnosis. However, many people find themselves seeking out professional help following the loss of a loved one, the end of a relationship, or the loss of financial means. In grief and loss therapy you will benefit from a compassionate and warm environment where you can explore your grief with out judgement or fear. Grief is often isolating in our sessions not only will you be given the space to process and remember your loss, but also the tools and guidance necessary to eventually continue a fulfilling life.

Sheila Berard, LCSW

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

99 Kinderkamack Road, Suite 300 , Westwood, New Jersey 07675

A loss can stop you in your tracks or some people report that they feel like they are "a witness" to their life and not a participant. We will work together on grieving your loss while also working on allowing you to become a participant in your life again. Having a dedicated space in your week to allow you to express your grief can allow you function at a higher level. Grieving does not have a timetable and it is not the same for everyone. Everyone grieves at their own pace and in their own way and we will work together at your speed and in the way that makes you most comfortable.

Anastasia Pytal, PsyD

Licensed Clinical Psychologist

39 E. Main Street, 2nd Floor, Little Falls, New Jersey 07424

Does life feel out of control? Do you feel like you are on an emotional roller coaster? A wide range of emotions are associated with loss. Grief, loss, and bereavement is unique to every person who experiences it. I will address your unique needs and help you learn effective ways to cope your loss. It is my goal to help your feel like your life is more manageable.

Mitchell Milch, LCSW

Psychotherapist/Couples Counselor

216 Dayton Street, 2nd Floor, Buzzer #1, Ridgewood, New Jersey 07450

Grieving the loss of loved one can be complicated if our valued identity and/or our equanimity was tied to that person given diffuse boundaries. When we overly depend on people regulate our emotions, self esteem or self confidence, then being without them can leave us angry, bereft, empty, etc. In psychotherapy we can rewrite the specious narrative that you were joined at the hip because you could not survive without that person. By internalizing what is offered by the therapist to enhance your self-reliance, you are then free to come to terms with the reality of loss of your loved one and internalize the relationship that is over. That person can now live on inside of you.

Patricia Pitta, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Clinical and Board Certified Family Psychologist

35 Bonnie Heights Road, Manhasset, New York 11030

Grief is about loss and the threat of loss. The stronger the bond between us and the person we have lost, the more we will hurt both physically and emotionally. When we are torn from a family member or friend, a part of us dies as well. Our natural need for attachment gets severed, often bringing the return of childhood fears. The world feels like a more dangerous place. As a result, we may feel out of control. We ache to have the loved person back. We know in the rational part of our minds that the person is not coming back, but it also seems impossible to let him go. We will remain emotionally conflicted until we can release our loved ones. Because letting go is so difficult, we must do it slow....

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